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Curriculum: Students Operate a 400 Tonne Satellite Antenna at Goonhilly Teen Tech Day

 

Students Operate a 400 Tonne Satellite Antenna at Goonhilly Teen Tech Day

Added 3 months ago


Report by Maggie Sykes - Year 10

On Wednesday 25th February a group of students from Richard Lander School visited the Goonhilly Earth Station to learn about how the station works and expand their own ideas for the future to enter into the Teen Tech National Science Awards. Goonhilly, on the Lizard Peninsula in Cornwall, is where the UK received the first ever trans-Atlantic satellite TV images, broadcast by Telstar, on 11 July 1962. For the duration of the morning we took part in two workshops learning about the various uses for the satellite dishes on site and how these dishes work. One of our favourite parts of the day was being the first group of children to operate Goonhilly’s largest dish, learning how to move it as well as learning certain positions that are commonly used to communicate with satellites. We then spent the afternoon watching a presentation about last years’ Teen Tech competition, finding out more about the competition from Teen Tech director, Roland Allen, and brainstorming ideas for this year’s awards. Being part of Teen Tech was a riveting experience which I hope will be continued for other year groups. 

Richard Lander School