01872 273 750
 

Curriculum: Practice or practise?

Practice or practise?


These words are frequently confused by people.  They sound the same but have a different purpose: practice is a noun and practise is a verb.  In American spelling there is no difference.  They use practice as both noun and verb.
 
Musicians attend rehearsals to practise their music. (Here it is the action of repeating the playing of music to improve.)

I’m going to music practice. (Here it is the name of the activity.)

Practice makes perfect!  If you still find this tricky then here is some advice from http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/practice_practise.htm

A LITTLE TRICK TO SPOT PRACTICE

Try using the word preparation (or lessons) instead of practice. If the sentence still makes sense, then practice is almost certainly correct.
(This trick works because practice is a noun, just like the words preparation and lessons.)

A LITTLE TRICK TO SPOT PRACTISE

Try using the verb to prepare (in its various forms, e.g., preparing, prepared, prepares) instead of practise. If the sentence still makes sense, then practise is almost certainly correct. However, if you find yourself trying to use preparation, then you should be using practice, because both are nouns.
(This trick works because to practise is a verb, just like to prepare. )

NO CONFUSION

There should be no confusion with practising or practised. These are always verbs.

 

Richard Lander School